ON THE SHORES OF THE MERRIMAC

ON THE SHORES OF THE MERRIMAC

  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
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Local History

Sept15-024-320x240Bartlett’s Reach lies in the midst of colonial New England, not far from the site of the Boston Tea Party and the early revolutionary battles at Lexington and Concord.  Amesbury, where Bartlett’s Reach is located, was settled in 1642.  Josiah Bartlett of Amesbury was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

 

 

 

Sept15-068-320x240The town situated on the Merrimack and Powow rivers was a center for boat building as well as the manufacture of hats and carriages.  The significance of Amesbury’s contribution to the War of Independence, the Civil War and early American industry are reflected in the historic sites and markers throughout town.

Robert Frost summered at a home on Point Shore, Amesbury’s picturesque village along the Merrimack River, down from Bartlett’s Reach.  Before Frost, John Greenleaf Whittier lived and wrote for years in Amesbury and was active in the small Quaker meetinghouse built in 1850.

 

sept-15-016-320x240In his poem entitled “June on the Merrimac,” the bard of Amesbury in 1876 writes

. . . Pleasant Valley smiles between
The river and the hill.

You know full well these banks of bloom,
The upland’s wavy line,
And how the sunshine tips with fire
The needles of the pine.


For more on the history of and characters from the community around Bartlett’s Reach
check Amesbury Treasures  and Wikipedia

 
 
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